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Trendy Tassels: The Turning Tides

Today, the tides have turned and these tassels were not only seen in our homes and on graduation caps. These leather fringes, colored beads, and embroidered threads became a trend that paved way to an income generating opportunity for a young designer, Lira Princess Cadorna.

Historically and traditionally, tassels were used in homes to decorate lampshades, pillows and curtains.

Specifically, ‘tassel’ came from the word ‘tassau’ which means “to a clasp at the neck of a garment”. Before, these served as symbols of power, especially by ancient priests. Tassels were believed to ward off evil spirits.

Today, the tides have turned and these tassels were not only seen in our homes and on graduation caps. These leather fringes, colored beads, and embroidered threads became a trend that paved way to an income generating opportunity for a young designer, Lira Princess Cadorna.

Lira is a graduate of Bachelor of Fine Arts Major in Product Design from the University of the Philippines Cebu. During her college days, she was also fond of making clothes. According to her, this hobby was her way to practice creativity and a way to relax. But she was also fond of making her own accessories.

Lira also makes clothes, bracelets, and pouches.

Tassel earrings were really a trend that started last year. “I’m not usually one to follow trends but as I inspected the items that other stores had, I thought to myself that I could make the same thing and sell it for a much cheaper price,” Lira says.

Lira started with Php 180 as her capital. With that, she was able to buy three balls of string, a few pairs of fishhook earrings, and a pack of jump rings.

As a start-up business, Lira manages her expenses carefully. “What I do is keep the profit and use the capital I gained back to buy more supplies and a percentage of the profit for expansion,” she adds.

Her fan-shaped tassel earrings range from Php 100 to Php 180 only.

From making jewelries for herself, she followed the trend and started up her own business that eventually clicked. “I got a few messages from some of my schoolmates. Next thing I know is that their friends wanted to order too,” Lira says.

Her tassel earrings range from Php 100 to Php 180 only. “I do ship locally but the buyer shoulders the shipping fee. For bulk orders, I usually tell them that I would need one to two weeks to finish their orders depending on the volume. If they’re okay with the waiting time, then it’s a go,” Lira shares.

But juggling her start-up business in college was a roller coaster ride. She makes all the earrings herself while doing school works at the same time. “It was also hard to find the supplies that would pass my standards in quality and price so I had to keep finding sources that would best suit the business until I was satisfied,” Lira says.

Her hobby in making pieces of jewelry also challenged her creativity and designed more shapes.

Her time management was tested. “There was no time to slack off so I had to make sure I didn’t do things that were unnecessary so that nothing would be compromised. When it came to the supplies, I had to exert more effort to get what I wanted to achieve the product quality that I want,” Lira shares.

This trend is not yet over, Lira adds. As for her, she tries to study more of the trend and see what it can offer that will eventually challenge her creativity.

The tides have turned and the trend’s flow allows creativity to flow as well. “Find something you think you like and you’re good at. If you don’t think you’re good enough, practice, practice, practice,” Lira advices.

As a young designer, Lira’s journey in the industry is a long way to go but according to her confidence is the key. “Sometimes, what hinders people from sharing and selling their works is that they’re not confident enough. When you’re happy with your output, put on that confidence coat, go out there, and sell your product to the world,” she says.

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Events

BVLGARI in Cebu

May 10 – Cebu City  |  Step inside a world of opulence where gold shimmers and diamonds sparkle. BVLGARI, the renowned Italian luxury brand, is celebrated for its exquisite gemstone jewelry, thin watches, perfumes, and leather goods. With a legacy dating back to 1884, BVLGARI has become synonymous with elegance and craftsmanship. The newest BVLGARI boutique opened last week at the sparkling The Mall at Nustar Resort and Casino, fast becoming the shopping destination for discerning consumers.

Eva Gullas, Jeffrey Hang, Jaja Chiongbian-Rama and Butch Carungay

Jeffrey Hang, BVLGARI’s Regional Marketing Director for South East Asia, flew in from Singapore to welcome guests. “We are happy to unveil BVLGARI to the Cebu market. This is the company’s 140th year, and BVLGARI celebrates this landmark with the Aeterna High Jewelry Collection in Rome this coming May 20, attended by all our global ambassadors like Zendaya and Black Pink” Jeffrey shares with us. The collection will be available in SE Asia later in the year and in the Philippines at the end of the year.

Leading the ribbon cutting was Joseph Muñoz (commercial director of Bulgari Philippines, Jeffry Hang (regional marketing director of Bulgari South East Asian operations, Pia Wurtzbach-Jauncey (Bulgari Ambasadress and Ms. Universe 2015), Allan Teo (chief operating officer of NUSTAR Resort and Casino and May Adolfo (mall director of NUSTAR Cebu).

Pia Wurtzbach-Jauncey, BVLGARI’s local Ambasadress and Ms. Universe 2015

Sheila Osmeña-Go and Jaja Chiongbian-Rama

Spotted at the event was Joseph Muñoz, Commercial Director of Bulgari Philippines escorting Pia Wurtzbach-Jauncey, BVLGARI’s local Ambasadress and Ms. Universe 2015, Allan Teo, Chief Operating Officer of NUSTAR Resort and Casino, Howard Go, Summit Media’s CEO and his wife, Cebuana Sheila Osmeña-Go as well as some of Cebu’s young fashionable set like Claudia Bezza Yeung, Marjay Ramirez, and Danessa Onglatco.

May Adolfo, Danessa Onglatco, Marjay Ramirez and Claudia Bezza-Yeung

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Fashion

The Qipao As Interpreted by Innovative Filipino Designers: PHILIP RODRIGUEZ

The Qipao, an iconic symbol of Chinese fashion, takes center stage as we celebrate the Lunar New Year of the Wood Dragon. This singular closely-fitted garment crafted from the most opulent silks originated in 1920’s Shanghai. ZEE fashion editor Oj Hofer, has sought the creative insights of some of the Philippines’ most innovative designers for their interpretation of the elegant Qipao, also known as Cheongsam.

Cebu’s esteemed designer, Philip Rodriguez, pays homage to imperial attire with this stunning yellow silk brocade qipao. While adhering to the traditional cheongsam silhouette, Rodriguez infuses a touch of sensuality by incorporating see-through silk tulle panels along the waistline. Known for his timeless designs and culturally respectful creations, Rodriguez’s attention to detail is unparalleled. His embellishments are intricate and exquisite, showcasing impeccable taste and luxurious design without veering into ostentation. Take, for instance, his cheongsam for the Year of the Dragon. While it may seem daring compared to traditional sensibilities, Rodriguez maintains elegance by delicately veiling the wearer’s skin with sheer tulle on the cutout side panels. The front slit of the dress is cautiously calculated to strike the perfect balance between modesty and allure “I design for women who possess sophistication beyond their years, “ Philip emphasizes. “My clothes are crafted to evoke a sense of beauty and allure, leaving her feeling exquisite and confident.” As a seasoned designer, Rodriguez consistently achieves harmony in his designs. His qipao for 2024 seamlessly blends elements of royalty and sensuality, luxury and practicality, reflecting his mastery of the craft and his ability to create pieces that are truly elegant and well-balance.

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Fashion

The Qipao As Interpreted by Innovative Filipino Designers: JC BUENDIA

The Qipao, an iconic symbol of Chinese fashion, takes center stage as we celebrate the Lunar New Year of the Wood Dragon. This singular closely-fitted garment crafted from the most opulent silks originated in 1920’s Shanghai. ZEE fashion editor Oj Hofer, has sought the creative insights of some of the Philippines’ most innovative designers for their interpretation of the elegant Qipao, also known as Cheongsam.

JC Buendia, celebrated for his ability to tell a million style stories through minimalist details, is a master of clean, chic lines in fashion. Eschewing frivolity and nonsensical embellishments, every element of his designs contributes to their overall elegance.

Inspired by cinematic portrayals of Chinoiserie, Buendia’s first fascination with the Qipao began with Gloria Romero’s iconic portrayal of a Chinese princess disguised as a ‘sampan’ girl in the 1957 film “Hong Kong Holiday.”

“This admiration for orientalalia only deepened as I watched films like “The Last Emperor” and “In The Mood For Love,” JC recalls.

Buendia’s latest creation is a testament to this cinematic influence. His interpretation of the Qipao for the Year of the Wood Dragon features a cropped top crafted from silk Dupioni, embellished with diamond brooches on the reverse closure for a touch of glamour. Paired with a tea-length bouffant skirt made from frothy layers of delicate tulle, the ensemble exudes sophistication and timeless elegance.

With meticulous attention to detail and a keen eye for design, JC Buendia’s Qipao captures the essence of cinematic glamour while offering a contemporary twist on a classic silhouette. It’s a tribute to the enduring allure of Chinoiserie and the timeless beauty of the Cheongsam.

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